How to travel Japan with a backpack; A minimalist packing guide.

To be honest I didn't consider my packing very minimalist until I heard others reactions to how much I took. I managed to fit everything in a small back pack and a shoulder bag and still had some room to spare. My partner and I were in Japan for 15 days and got by just fine with our back packs. If anything there were a few things I wish I left out  . We traveled in July which is a hot , wet , and humid time. You will need to adjust your gear list according to the weather conditions during your trip. 

Here are the bags we took : 


via http://www.rebelsport.co.nz/games-and-accessories/bags/backpacks/8096792/Dakine-Hana-Backpack-Libby-26Litres.html

I had a 26 Litre Dakine back pack. Nothing special , just a bag.  A back pack of a similar size with more compartments would be a better option.

via http://trooplondon.com.pl/283-thickbox_default/damska-torebka-do-jeansow-m-trp0237.jpg

I also had one troop shoulder bag. These are great as they are very sturdy and a good size- you can fit a fair amount in them , but not so much that it will get heavy like a satchel will.  You could use a larger handbag instead if that is more your style .

My partner took his stuff in a bag similar to this . It was very easy to spot in a crowd !

via http://www.rebelsport.co.nz/games-and-accessories/bags/backpacks/8104143/adidas-BP-Power-III-Backpack-Easy-Coral-25.75-Litres.html

He also had his camera bag with him .
via http://www.gadgetguy.com.au/lowepros-new-bag-isnt-as-black-as-your-camera-bag/

The gear list 


Clothes


Packing light will mean washing often . However its no big deal in Japan . Most hostels and hotels will have laundry facilities and if they don't there will be a laundromat nearby. For me the choice between lugging around a heavy bag or washing my clothes every now then was simple. I am the kind of person who only has a few outfits they like to wear anyway.

This is what I took :
(my photo)
  • 3 x dresses - one more dressy, two more casual. 
  • 1 x tee shirt dress- a long shirt that can be worn with jeggings , or as a dress with a belt and tights
  • 1x light rain jacket- the kind that folds up very small
  • 1x sweater- one that can be worn open or closed and looks nice over dresses
  • 1x singlet - to wear under if its cold , or wear by itself with jeggings and sweater. 
  • 1x belt
  • 1x scarf
  • 1x converse shoes 
  • 1x foldable flats 
  • 2x sports bras
  • 3x underwear
  • a bunch of tights-  sparkly ones, nude ones, polka dot ones, thick black ones. 
  • 2x pairs of lacy socks 
  • 1x black jeggings - they look tidy and are much lighter than real jeans. Any light pair of trousers would work. 


A friend who lives in Japan advised me to take very short, summery clothes and I am glad I listened to her. I ended up taking a lot of dresses because we weren't doing any serious hiking. 

For shoes I wore converse all stars the whole trip . This will only work for you if you can handle having no arch support. I wear converse shoes basically everyday at home so that's why I took them. The aim should be to find a comfortable shoe that doesn't look to silly when worn in a city . Have a look at athleisure trends to see what kind of sports shoes can be trendy. Another good option for the rainy season would be to pack a pair of comfy water resistant boots like these:

via https://www.facebook.com/GummieBoots/

The main thing is to have clothes that are practical and that you feel like yourself in.  I found that skater dresses were a good option as they can be dressed up or down. You can also wear a sweater over top to make it look like a skirt and you can wear different styles of tights underneath to change up your look -tights take up almost no space or weight so you can bring a few, or buy some cute ones while you are in japan. Having dresses means you don't have to worry about coordinating anything, which is great as people tend to dress really nice in Japan and look well put together.

If you go during the rainy season be sure to pack a light rain jacket . You won't need a bulky one as it will still be hot and you can always wear a sweater under it and thick tights if you get cold.

Scarfs are great for traveling too as you can roll them up for a neck pillow or use it like a small blanket on planes. You can also wear them a few different ways to help break up the monotony of repeated outfits.

via https://nz.pinterest.com/pin/130815564153630091/


Find something that will work for you and your style. You will only need about three outfits . Pick fabrics that are light, dry fast and pack down small. Remember to chose things that  are interchangeable  and can be easily layered.

What my partner took  :

(my photo)

2x Running shorts 
1x pants
3x T shirts
3x Pairs of socks
1x Long sleeve shirt
1x Singlet
1x Hoodie
1x Light rain jacket that folds up small
1x sneakers
1x Scuffs
3x Underwear

Guys have it a bit easier as a tidy pair of pants and a shirt are basically socially  acceptable no matter the occasion. Again this is just what worked for us . You will have your own fashion sense to work with.

Toiletries 


I took travel containers full of foundation , sunscreen, shower gel , shampoo and conditioner.I actually wouldn't bother with this as you have to deal with airline regulations . Its so easy to buy when you get there and that way you get to try new stuff. Most places we stayed at ended up providing shower gel , shampoo and conditioner anyway.

I took one tube of mascara , a mini eyebrow pencil, and a lip balm.  For make up lovers who want to pack light , try to only bring the essentials. Chances are you will want to buy new products in Japan , you can stock up while you are there and buy a cheap bag to fly it home in . This is still easier than taking a big suitcase there in my opinion.

Deodorant, baby wipes and a toothbrush are the main things to worry about. Anything else is easy enough to find. 

You can also purchase little ready made bags which are quite handy if you would rather have things with you. 

via https://www.amcal.com.au/travel-mini-mens-personal-hygiene---4-piece-set-p-9300663453627

Electronics 


  •  Some power banks 
  • Cellphone 
  • Camera 
  • Chargers for everything
  • An adapter 

Other

  • Your passport 
  • Your JR rail pass exchange card (if you have one)
  • Your wallet - debit/credit card and ID. 
  • Mesh laundry bags or clear zip lock bags -to organize your back pack 
  • A travel towel (most places will have free towels , but just in case) 
  • A plastic bag for carrying any rubbish- there are barely any public rubbish bins in Japan. 
  • Some reusable bags for shopping or carrying laundry.  
via https://www.tokopedia.com/syalitagrosir/eco-baggu-shopping-bag-tas-belanja-ramah-lingkungan-shop-bag


Traveling with a small backpack makes you feel like less of a tourist . You don't have to struggle with heavy suitcases or large duffel bags on trains or up staircases . I think this is the best way of doing things because when you arrive you can simply hop off the plane with your bags. You don't need to worry about anything getting damaged or lost by baggage handlers . If you end up buying alot in Japan then simply buy a cheap bag while you are there too.  It is always a good idea to save any shopping untill the end of the trip so you have less to carry around. 

 I think I could have used the exact same things to travel for a longer period of time. For winter I would have simply needed to add a big jacket, some thermal leggings and some boots.  I think this would still fit as carry on provided you wore the bulky clothes on the plane.  

Just remember that to be minimal you will have to do some washing  and if you ever need something chances are you can purchase it in Japan. The sense of freedom is well worth it in my opinion . 

So what do you think? Will you try packing light on your trip to Japan? Do you have any other tips I may have missed ? Let me know in the comments. 




Chloe Hamilton