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Should You Teach English in Japan? | Finding Your Way In

Chris Broad is here to answer the age-old question, ‘is teaching English in Japan the foreigner visa trap?’. From the guy who’s done it all, find out the pro’s and con’s to teaching English in Japan, and points to consider if you’re interested in moving and working in Japan.

Posted: a year ago by Tokyo Creative Quote

Chris Broad is here to answer the age-old question, ‘is teaching English in Japan the foreigner visa trap?’. From the guy who’s done it all, find out the pro’s and con’s to teaching English in Japan, and points to consider if you’re interested in moving and working in Japan.

Posted: a year ago by Erik Quote

What Major should I get for my bachelor's degree? I'm a freshman in college and am really determined to get a job in Japan but, I'm still unclear what major I should get. Do I have to get a teaching cert. if I am to become a teacher or can it be anything?

Posted: a year ago by Elise Quote

@Erik– As a current 4th/5th year (?who knows at this point now?) University student who has deferred and transferred more times than I should, my greatest advice is to LEARN WHAT YOU LOVE! Loving or even, just being interested in what you learn is so rare. If there's passion in what you've learned from University, a company anywhere will see that. No stressy!

In the context of Japan, for most companies, you don't need to have an Education degree to back you up for English teaching. Of course, it helps, but it's definitely not essential. If you're really that determined to work in Japan, then the one piece of advice I'm sure a lot of us agree on is to start learning your Japanese!

Posted: a year ago by Blake Quote

I currently have a degree in Safety Sciences (the equivalent to an Environmental Health and Safety Degree) and if I would want to do the teaching route, I know I would need to get at the least a teaching certificate. In your opinion would this be enough as I do already prepare and conduct training and meetings (so some form of teaching") or should I be expanding to a sort of Teaching Degree? Or is my degree enough to likely find a job outside of teaching?

Posted: a year ago by Daniel Quote

One thing I'd definitely look into while in university is a teaching course that will grant you a CELTA (Certificate in English Language Teaching for Adults) qualification upon completion. It's a world wide qualification and it's power is quite strong when it comes to overseas teaching. It's not required to teach but it can definitely boost your chances at landing a teaching job overseas.

Posted: a year ago by Khaltzane Quote

Ironically, despite getting 1/3 of what an ALT would get currently, I would still be able to afford the same lifestyle I have currently in Australia. I'm definitely looking forward to getting through my study to apply for the JET program.

Luckily for me the courses I'm doing are a diploma of TESOL, and a bachelor's of arts majoring in English as a second language, and planning on studying Japanese in Japan for three months.

Posted: a year ago by Ryan Quote

Im on my way to finishing an IT degree in South Africa. As much as I love tech and programming I wouldnt mind teaching just to get into japan. Ive looked online for IT related jobs but most of them require you to speak fluent Japanese and have experience for at least 3 years. So I thought maybe just having a degree would help me get into teaching. Am i going about this the wrong way?

Posted: a year ago by Cat Quote

Is there a possibility of doing the jet programme when you dont have a university degree? Unfortunately I wasnt able to go to uni before. I have however followed a few japanese language courses, read countless books about Japans lifestyle and such, have been to Japan twice and am considering doing a tefl course for teaching. Or should I be looking at other possibilities?

Posted: a year ago by Danica Quote

I feel like everyone realizes pretty quickly that JET pays the best and is arguably the "best" due to the perks they offer in addition to pay, but it's also the hardest program to get into. There are a ton of eikawas that advertise to would-be teachers across the world, but I'm curious how one wades through them. Which do you know of that are legit and actually pay enough to live on? I've heard so many horror stories from friends, that sometimes applying to JET seems like the only option, and I KNOW there are a million options. How do you discover what's best for you, teaching in a school or in an eikawa? If you get in and discover you're in one of those horror stories, how do you get out? I don't think any of this is anything Chris had to deal with, but there are a million videos about the JET Programme already, and I feel like these are all questions that never get answered.

On more of a content note, how does one balance content creation with the schedule of trying to pay bills each month an an ALT salary, especially in one of those non-JET programs? I just. I have so. many. questions.

Posted: a year ago by Elise Quote
by Danica a year ago
I feel like everyone realizes pretty quickly that JET pays the best and is arguably the "best" due to the perks they offer in addition to pay, but it's also the hardest program to get into. There are a ton of eikawas that advertise to would-be teachers across the world, but I'm curious how one wades through them. Which do you know of that are legit and actually pay enough to live on? I've heard so many horror stories from friends, that sometimes applying to JET seems like the only option, and I KNOW there are a million options. How do you discover what's best for you, teaching in a school or in an eikawa? If you get in and discover you're in one of those horror stories, how do you get out? I don't think any of this is anything Chris had to deal with, but there are a million videos about the JET Programme already, and I feel like these are all questions that never get answered.

On more of a content note, how does one balance content creation with the schedule of trying to pay bills each month an an ALT salary, especially in one of those non-JET programs? I just. I have so. many. questions.

I totally agree, Danica! JET is definitely the most internationally-known teaching opportunity, however, like what Chris O says in his video about working in Japan, JET usually places you in the countryside. Apart from the fact that he's naturally a city boy, at the time, Chris O was also intending to stay in Japan for an extended period of time and wanted to achieve his career goals in a set amount of time. So, JET is amazing, and teaching English in the countryside will definitely force your Japanese to improve and understand true Japanese culture, however, what you might be missing out on is the tight network of the city.

Which is why, Danica, I completely back you up! There are plenty of English teaching schools in the city that can also give you the opportunity to do some teaching. Your opportunities are everywhere!!

As for how to manage personal creative projects, teaching and bills... girl, I need advice on this too. Let me find someone who can help us!

Posted: a year ago by Quote

Do I need to have a degree? I am from Canada and I am taking a college three year program. Will an advanced diploma be enough?

Posted: 11 months ago by Quote

I feel like everyone who moves to Japan does so while still really young. I feel like I'm way too old for it already, having graduated (while being older than your average college student while graduating) and having a job in my home country. I also don't think they hire foreign librarians in Japan, lol.

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