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The Visa Vex: My Knowledge of Australian-Japanese Visa Application Process

Wondering how your favorite YouTubers are still able to stay and work in Japan freely? Emma (Tokidoki Traveller) gives us a deep-dive of how she received her Japanese visa and what are some of the processes that you have to be aware of if you’re interested in moving to Japan.

Posted: 2 months ago by Tokyo Creative Quote

Wondering how your favorite YouTubers are still able to stay and work in Japan freely? Emma (Tokidoki Traveller) gives us a deep-dive of how she received her Japanese visa and what are some of the processes that you have to be aware of if you’re interested in moving to Japan.

Posted: 2 months ago by Dutchie Abroad Quote

Thanks for shedding some light on this case! Really seems that getting a degree is the only way to get a long term visa.. I have another question though. The Working Holiday Visa isn't available for Dutch citizens. Does that mean I also can't apply for the English teaching programs? Or could I get an actual working visa for that? I do have a Bachelor degree (my partner doesn't).

Posted: 2 months ago by Sam Quote
by Dutchie Abroad 2 months ago
Thanks for shedding some light on this case! Really seems that getting a degree is the only way to get a long term visa.. I have another question though. The Working Holiday Visa isn't available for Dutch citizens. Does that mean I also can't apply for the English teaching programs? Or could I get an actual working visa for that? I do have a Bachelor degree (my partner doesn't).

I think the teaching programs like JET put you on a working visa, not working holiday. Although I’ve heard you have to be a native English speaker. But I’ve heard Dutch have the highest English fluency rate! So it may still be worth enquiring / applying

Posted: 2 months ago by Dutchie Abroad Quote
by Sam 2 months ago
I think the teaching programs like JET put you on a working visa, not working holiday. Although I’ve heard you have to be a native English speaker. But I’ve heard Dutch have the highest English fluency rate! So it may still be worth enquiring / applying

Cool, that's what I hoped for! Yeah, I heard they prefer native speakers. However, my bachelor degree is for International Hospitality Management and was taught completely in English. So I basically have a Bachelor level of business English. I don't have any official documents for this though, except proof that I had English writing classes etc integrated in my Bachelor degree.

Posted: 2 months ago by Josua Quote

Very insightful video about Visa's and how to apply. I have a question though, I currently live in South Africa and want to eventually move to Japan, at the end of the year I will graduate University with a diploma in business management but not a degree, how can I apply for a Visa or which would work best as I know Japan heavily values degrees. I could study another year and get a degree, but I'd rather start working. And if you work for yourself is there maybe a better Chance of being able to obtain Visa? I am trying to think of some different options to eventually move, please let me know of anything I can do or apply for.

Posted: 2 months ago by Elise Quote
by Sam 2 months ago
I think the teaching programs like JET put you on a working visa, not working holiday. Although I’ve heard you have to be a native English speaker. But I’ve heard Dutch have the highest English fluency rate! So it may still be worth enquiring / applying

Great advice Sam!

Posted: 2 months ago by Elise Quote
by Dutchie Abroad 2 months ago
Cool, that's what I hoped for! Yeah, I heard they prefer native speakers. However, my bachelor degree is for International Hospitality Management and was taught completely in English. So I basically have a Bachelor level of business English. I don't have any official documents for this though, except proof that I had English writing classes etc integrated in my Bachelor degree.

I'm sure if you're able to provide concrete documentation that outlines your skills in English then it should be good! Like Sam says, it might be best to enquire beforehand with your embassy, but to be honest, I really can't imagine them saying your level of English is low at all!

Posted: 2 months ago by Elise Quote
by Josua 2 months ago
Very insightful video about Visa's and how to apply. I have a question though, I currently live in South Africa and want to eventually move to Japan, at the end of the year I will graduate University with a diploma in business management but not a degree, how can I apply for a Visa or which would work best as I know Japan heavily values degrees. I could study another year and get a degree, but I'd rather start working. And if you work for yourself is there maybe a better Chance of being able to obtain Visa? I am trying to think of some different options to eventually move, please let me know of anything I can do or apply for.

Ah that sounds difficult. We at Tokyo Creative have a couple of staff members who also graduated with an Associates diploma, which unfortunately, in regards to the Japanese Government, doesn't equate to a Bachelors degree and/or higher.

It sounds like you're open to studying, so some of the options that might be available for you (if you're intent on living in Japan), is to start out with a student Visa by attending a language school here in Japan. I've done a little bit of research on your situation Josua and it looks like the available visas for South Africans to Japan is:

Temporary visitor’s visa – ranges from sightseeing, tourism, trade fairs through to business activities such as consultations, research or signing of contracts. Granted for a duration of 15, 30 or 90 days.

Transit visa – for sightseers on transit through Japan on their way to another destination. Granted for a period of 3 or 15 days.

Cultural activities visa – for cultural activities by artists or academics under the guidance of Japanese experts for the purpose of obtaining skills in Japanese arts or cultures. Granted for a period of 6 moths or one year.

College student visa – for studies at a Japanese college or equivalent. Visas may be granted for 1 year or two years and applicant must meet certain criteria such as proof of living expenses.

Precollege student visa – to receive education at Japanese high schools. Visas may be granted for 6 moths or one year and again certain criteria must be met such as proving adequate living expenses.

Trainee visa – Can be granted for 6 months or one year and is for activities to learn and acquire technology, skills, or knowledge at public or private organizations in Japan.

Designated activities visa – for activities designated by the Minister of Justice and can be granted for a period of 3 years, 1 year, 6 months or less.

(Taken by https://www.intergate-immigration.com/japanese-visa.php)

Perhaps any of these options could be useful to you!

Posted: 2 months ago by Elise Quote
by Josua 2 months ago
Very insightful video about Visa's and how to apply. I have a question though, I currently live in South Africa and want to eventually move to Japan, at the end of the year I will graduate University with a diploma in business management but not a degree, how can I apply for a Visa or which would work best as I know Japan heavily values degrees. I could study another year and get a degree, but I'd rather start working. And if you work for yourself is there maybe a better Chance of being able to obtain Visa? I am trying to think of some different options to eventually move, please let me know of anything I can do or apply for.

We have a video coming out soon where Sharla gives a really great detailed brief about the different types of Visas that are available and common to most foreigners living in Japan- I'll message you immediately when we've posted it! But essentially, she mentions a point about the Japanese Working Visa where if you don't have a Japanese Government-recognised degree, you'll need to prove with extensive documentation and proof that you have worked in your area of work or industry for at least 3 years. I think this is to confirm your professional knowledge and experience in your field of work, and like you mentioned, Japan is a country that recognises merits via document proof. You might need to delay your move a little but if you know you're going to spend your long-term in Japan, then maybe that might be an option for you to work in South Africa for a bit, save some money, learn as much as you can (and maybe some Japanese on the side if you're a noob like me!) and make the move to Japan in 3-4 years!

Posted: a month ago by Blair Quote

That was an incredibly insightful video! I just had one question however, for the bachelors degree is it absolutely important that you complete the degree before moving to Japan? For me this is a golden opportunity to be able to live and work in Japan as everything has sort of been put to a halt. I've only got 1 year left but I cant go back to university until March 2020. So would it be better for me to do the working holiday visa now or should I complete the degree first and then fly overseas?

P.S I may want to settle in Japan for a long period of time depending on my experience living on my own and I am highly considering starting a youtube career out of this.

Posted: a month ago by Josua Quote
by Elise 2 months ago
We have a video coming out soon where Sharla gives a really great detailed brief about the different types of Visas that are available and common to most foreigners living in Japan- I'll message you immediately when we've posted it! But essentially, she mentions a point about the Japanese Working Visa where if you don't have a Japanese Government-recognised degree, you'll need to prove with extensive documentation and proof that you have worked in your area of work or industry for at least 3 years. I think this is to confirm your professional knowledge and experience in your field of work, and like you mentioned, Japan is a country that recognises merits via document proof. You might need to delay your move a little but if you know you're going to spend your long-term in Japan, then maybe that might be an option for you to work in South Africa for a bit, save some money, learn as much as you can (and maybe some Japanese on the side if you're a noob like me!) and make the move to Japan in 3-4 years!

thank you so much for those insightful replies I really appreciate it. I'll look more into it. I might first take a holiday there before the final decision of moving, but I will try do that. thank you

Posted: a month ago by Josua Quote
by Elise 2 months ago
We have a video coming out soon where Sharla gives a really great detailed brief about the different types of Visas that are available and common to most foreigners living in Japan- I'll message you immediately when we've posted it! But essentially, she mentions a point about the Japanese Working Visa where if you don't have a Japanese Government-recognised degree, you'll need to prove with extensive documentation and proof that you have worked in your area of work or industry for at least 3 years. I think this is to confirm your professional knowledge and experience in your field of work, and like you mentioned, Japan is a country that recognises merits via document proof. You might need to delay your move a little but if you know you're going to spend your long-term in Japan, then maybe that might be an option for you to work in South Africa for a bit, save some money, learn as much as you can (and maybe some Japanese on the side if you're a noob like me!) and make the move to Japan in 3-4 years!

thank you so much for those insightful replies I really appreciate it. I'll look more into it. I might first take a holiday there before the final decision of moving, but I will try do that. thank you

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